Quinoa Nutrition facts

What is Quinoa?

Quinoa is known as a superfood, some people relate it to grain but it is actually a seed that comes from a plant most closely related to spinach. It is grown in the Andes mountains of South America.  The ancient Incas considered this plant sacred and called it “chisaya mama” which means ‘Mother of All Grains’. Quinoa grains are about the same size as millet, but flattened, with a pointed, oval shape. The color ranges from pale yellow through red and brown to black.

 

These are the Nutrition facts and why it’s so good for you:

Quinoa is a great source of iron, manganese, potassium, riboflavin, copper, phosphorous, tryptophan, B6, niacin and thiamine.  One cup of cooked quinoa has only 220 calories.  It also has 5 grams of fiber and 8 grams of protein.

Quinoa is stocked with life-sustaining nutrients all across the board, including all eight essential amino acids. There are other highly beneficial compounds, vitamins and minerals.

It is not surprising that it is being recommended for people who want to lose weight, for people who suffer from migraine, heart disease and atherosclerosis, for people with gluten sensitivity, for vegans, and basically for everyone who wants to eat healthy.

 

How to Prepare:

Quinoa cooks very easily, in about 15 minutes. Like cooking rice in a stove top pot, you’ll want almost 2 cups of water per one part quinoa but be careful not to pour too much water in the pot, otherwise it will take even longer.

Cook quinoa at a high setting until it starts boiling and then cover and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. When you see the ring-shaped sprouts popping out, you’ll know the quinoa is almost ready. Stir the quinoa so all the water gets absorbed.

Quinoa by itself is rather bland, I like to add olive oil, bullion, and if you like spicy food as I do some chili pepper as it boils. Quinoa is fun to cook with and you can add anything you like to it, from veggies to poultry, or you could make it as a cereal with milk and cinnamon, you can incorporate it into dessert, it’s a chameleon.

I hope that this was helpful for more information I added below some of the sites I pulled this off of. Enjoy!

http://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/stories/quinoanutritionfacts

www.quinoanutritionfacts.com/

nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/10352/2

 

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “Quinoa Nutrition facts

  1. I just recently heard about quinoa when i was looking up some weight watchers recipes! I haven’t tried it yet. Is it similar to couscous?

    • I would say that it is similar to couscous as far as the concept of cooking it goes. But it has a completely different texture and taste. It does derive from a plant whereas couscous is semolina and flour so still quite starchy. I would say that if you like couscous you are going to love quinoa. I am a total lover of quinoa and my husband is also, he used to always want couscous and now he loves the quinoa. I know that you will love it and it’s so healthy!!

      • Thanks for the feedback! I’m definitely going to try it. For the past month I’ve started changing my entire diet around and I’m looking for the healthiest foods out there! Love your site!

      • Ok, So I tried the Quinoa and I am so in love with it! It tastes great and feels so lite. It doesn’t make my stomach feel “heavy’ after eating it. I use it instead of rice! Yum!

      • That’s great. I feel the exact same way when I eat it, the nice thing about it is that it’s so good for you, and so flexible you can pair it up with anything you want. I am glad that you liked it.

      • I didn’t put too much in it. I used 1.5 lbs ground turkey (93% lean), 1 cup quinoa, salt, pepper, parsley, minced garlic, some olive oil, and some low fat shredded cheese. Let me know if you come up with some other recipe! I’d love to try :o)

      • I will. There should be a couple recipes in the blog with quinoa, I have one that I made the other night I will post it soon. Ciao, Yio’-ta

Comment Here:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s